Alaskan Malamute

Recommended for: Families
Maintenance Level: Medium
Lifespan: 12-16 years
Temperament:
Intelligent, active
Health Risk:
High probability of health issues during its lifetime, hence it is one of the more expensive breeds to insure.


Breed Overview


The Alaskan Malamute is a large and muscular domesticated dog with a heavy fur coat and bounds of energy. The Malamute was originally put to use as a freight-carrying animal because of their endurance in cold climates. They are best known today as slay dogs, teamed up to cart people and cargo across the frozen tundra of Alaska.
The Malamute is a part of the Spitz family of dogs. Developed by the Mahlemuitstribe of Alaska, their vast history can be traced back 2,000 to 3,000 years.
Alaskan Malamutes have a thick double coat that can be as much as ten centimetres in length. Athletic, very strong and fast working dogs, the Alaskan Malamute is
similar in appearance and build to the Siberian Husky with the two often being mistaken for each other. Bred by native the peoples of Alaska and developed to survive the nomadic tendencies of these their owners, the Alaskan Malamute is an intelligent and resourceful dog, athletic and spirited.
The Alaskan Malamute is unique in that it is still being used today for the original purposes that surround its breeding. For this reason, the Malamute is a very
independent, inquisitive and resourceful animal. Because they are bred to survive one of the most unforgiving environments inhabited by humans, they have a very strong hunter’s instinct and can cause trouble if let off the leash in public—known to chase smaller dogs, cars and wildlife.
They are a popular breed in North America, the United Kingdom and Australia. While they are independent animals, they are affectionate and gentle with their families
and very loyal. Alaskan Malamutes have been employed in various working roles, including search and rescue.
Alaskan malamutes are generally sized at between 58 and 63 cm with a healthy weight ranging between 36 and 43 kgs. They will generally live to between 12 and 16 years of age.
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